Students chant homophobic slurs to rile rival football team

Students chanted “powder blue faggots” at a Cleveland-area high school football game Friday night between rivals Eastlake North High School and Willoughby South High School to taunt the opposing team.

The video has received hundreds of comments from students, alumni and other people who are not affiliated with either school. One commenter explains her school answers the “powder blue faggots” chant with “halloween homos,” and that the entire exchange of homonegative cheering is all in good fun and shouldn’t offend anyone.

Many of the comments echo this nonchalant attitude toward using anti-gay slurs as a means to taunt people regardless of sexuality, brushing the entire incident off.  It is almost as if what they are really saying is, “You got us all wrong. We weren’t offending anyone because we didn’t mean gay as in homosexual, we meant gay as in, you know, stupid.”

During the course of the video, no school administrators intervened.

Meanwhile, nearby Mentor High School is embroiled in legal trouble because parents of four bullied students who committed suicide over a two year period are suing the district for not stopping the harassment.

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8 thoughts on “Students chant homophobic slurs to rile rival football team

  1. I honestly don’t think that the students were directing the word at any particular person or group of people. They were merely using the word in a more general sense by attempting to simply ‘tick off’ their opponents. Nothing more, nothing less. However, was it classy? No.

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  5. It is just chants between 2 rival schools, I am sure there were lots of chants similar to that when I went.

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